Sulawesi art: Animal painting found in cave is 44,000 years old

Sulawesi Animal painting cave 44000 years old

Sulawesi art: Animal painting found in cave is 44,000 years old

Sulawesi art: Animal painting found in cave is 44,000 years old – A painting discovered on the wall of an Indonesian cave has been found to be 44,000 years old.  The art appears to show a buffalo being hunted by part-human, part-animal creatures holding spears and possibly ropes.

Some researchers think the scene could be the world’s oldest-recorded story.


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The findings were presented in the journal Nature by archaeologists from Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia.

Adam Brumm – an archaeologist at Griffith – first saw the pictures two years ago, after a colleague in Indonesia shimmied up a fig tree to reach the cave passage.

“These images appeared on my iPhone,” said Mr Brumm. “I think I said the characteristic Australian four-letter word out very loud.”

The Indonesian drawing is not the oldest in the world. Last year, scientists said they found “humanity’s oldest drawing” on a fragment of rock in South Africa, dated at 73,000 years old.

What do the drawings show?

Sulawesi Animal painting cave 44000 years old

The drawings were found in a cave called Leang Bulu’Sipong 4 in the south of Sulawesi, an Indonesian island east of Borneo.

The panel is almost five metres wide and appears to show a type of buffalo called an anoa, plus wild pigs found on Sulawesi.

Alongside them are smaller figures that look human – but also have animal features such as tails and snouts.

In one section, an anoa is flanked by several figures holding spears.

“I’ve never seen anything like this before,” said Mr Brumm. “I mean, we’ve seen hundreds of rock art sites in this region – but we’ve never seen anything like a hunting scene.”

However, other researchers have questioned whether the panel represents a single story – and say it could be a series of images painted over a longer period.

“Whether it’s a scene is questionable,” says Paul Pettitt, an archaeologist and rock-art specialist at Durham University told Nature.
How do we know it’s 44,000 years old?

The team analysed calcite “popcorn” that had built up on the painting.

Radioactive uranium in the mineral slowly decays into thorium, so the team measured the levels of different isotopes of these elements.

They found the calcite on a pig began forming at least 43,900 years ago, and the deposits on two buffalo were at least 40,900 years old.

There are at least 242 caves or shelters with ancient imagery in Sulawesi alone – and new sites are being discovered annually.
How does it compare to other prehistoric art?

It may not be the oldest drawing, but researchers say it could be the oldest story ever found.

“Previously, rock art found in European sites dated to around 14,000 to 21,000 years old were considered to be the world’s oldest clearly narrative artworks,” said the paper in Nature.

The Sulawesi drawings could also be the oldest animal drawing ever found.

Last year, a cave painting in Borneo – thought to be the oldest of an animal – was found to be at least 40,000 years old.


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How to tell if your digital addiction is ruining your life

How to tell if your digital addiction is ruining your life

How to tell if your digital addiction is ruining your life
Some people fear we’re interacting more with our phones at the expense of our loved ones.
Ana Blazic Pavlovic/Shutterstock.com

Terri R. Kurtzberg, Rutgers University Newark

The fear that digital distractions are ruining our lives and friendships is widespread.


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To be sure, digital addiction is real. Consider the 2,600 times we touch our phones every day, our panic when we temporarily misplace a device, the experience of “phantom vibration syndrome” and how merely seeing a message alert can be as distracting as checking the message itself.

This can have real consequences. For example, other people do take it personally if you stop talking to them to answer a message. And taking a break from a task to look at your cell phone precludes deep thinking on whatever you were doing.

But this tells only part of the story. We need to also acknowledge that today’s technologies can make us more connected than ever before.

So how do we avoid the potential pitfalls while still reaping the benefits?

How screens affect our interactions

As a researcher in the area of technology and communications, I have spent nearly two decades looking at the ways in which interacting via screens is different from interacting in other ways, including face-to-face, on the phone and in writing.

My research group has produced study after study showing that people are more self-serving (that is, they lie more), more negative (for example, giving others lower feedback ratings) and less cooperative (more “looking out for No. 1” behavior) when they use digital means of communicating. And for children under five, there are serious concerns for brain development.

Our fears about the impact of increasing amounts of screen time on ourselves and our children involve three main areas: mental health, addiction and the level of engagement with what’s going on around us. In all three, the risks are generally overblown.

Much has been made of the potential links between depression and cell phone use – especially in teenagers – but recent evidence seems to indicate that that link is tenuous at best.

As for addiction, the field of psychology has now recognized video game addiction as a genuine and diagnosable problem. Stories from rehab centers for people whose lives have been consumed by this addiction suggest the phenomenon is real and the suffering can be quite genuine.

But this is rare compared with the numbers of people who play online games without serious consequences.

And in terms of engagement, despite growing amounts of time spent on screens, the vast majority of kids do still get educated, make friends and go on to lead productive lives.

Teens can spend countless hours on their phones and still be engaged in life around them.
View Apart/Shutterstock.com

A more connected world

As more and more of our interactions move away from the traditional face-to-face and into the online realm, I believe we must recognize that in some areas, richness and engagement may also be on the rise.

Colleagues can work together from afar, friends can keep in touch without restraint and grandparents can directly touch base with their grandkids without needing to schedule a visit or go through the parents.

Language changes as we interact in shorter bursts, allowing us to connect in less formal ways. Humor changes as we are able to add visuals – pictures, emojis, GIFs, memes – to our words. Even those online video games can be a portal to increased social interactions for some.

Do you have a problem?

Perhaps the best way to evaluate time spent with our phones is to ask two related questions.

First, what are you doing with the time you’re devoting to your phone, and is it consistent with your values and priorities?

If you feel that you and your kids are enjoying your screen time and not risking sleep, work or in-person interactions, you may not have much reason for concern. To help with this task, tools and apps that can track your screen time and let you know where your attention is being directed – or even limit where it can go – are becoming more prevalent.

Secondly, what are your blind spots about where and how phone use might be limiting the rest of your life?

Most of us realize we shouldn’t use phones right before bed – or, even worse, when driving or crossing streets – and we know we should keep an eye on our kids and teenagers to ensure that they are building good habits both inside and outside the digital realm. But we’re less clear on how our phones might be affecting our lives in other ways.

The latest research offers some lessons. For starters, we’re not as good as we think at multitasking: We generally give worse attention to both tasks when we try to do two things at once. Over time, people who do this constantly end up with greater error rates on tasks, perhaps linked to poorer working memories.

Even the mere presence of a phone can limit your engagement with work and your ability to build relationships with others.

This is a good time to put that phone away.
AstroStar/Shutterstock.com

Finding that ever-elusive balance

All of this means that even though you may not need to worry about your phone use overall, there are still moments when you’d be wise to put your device out of sight and earshot. This will give you the best chance to think about complex tasks without interruption or to engage more fully with those around you.

Putting down our phones completely seems neither realistic nor desirable: Society has moved forward, phones in hand.

But choosing the moments where being phone-free is most valuable can help keep you on track.

[ You’re smart and curious about the world. So are The Conversation’s authors and editors. You can read us daily by subscribing to our newsletter. ]The Conversation

Terri R. Kurtzberg, Associate Professor of Management and Global Business , Rutgers University Newark

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.


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Strict Prevention Of African Swine Flu

Strict Prevention Of African Swine Flu

Strict Prevention Of African Swine Flu – African Swine Fever (ASF) or better known as African swine flu is threatening swine farms in Indonesia, especially Bali.

Prevent African Swine Flu, Airport and Port Surveillance Tightened.


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DENPASAR – African Swine Fever (ASF) or better known as African swine flu is threatening swine farms in Indonesia, especially Bali.

Anticipating the threat of this ASF disease, the Denpasar Agricultural Quarantine held a coordination meeting with agencies to tighten supervision through the Airport and Port.

Head of the Denpasar Agricultural Quarantine said the Coordination Meeting as a step in uniting perceptions of early prevention efforts for ASF entry.

“This meeting discusses the efforts and strategies taken against the possibilities of potential entry and spread of diseases caused by viruses from the family Asfarviridae (a family of viruses that have only one genus and one species, namely the Asfivirus genus and the African swine fever virus species)”, he explained at the Agriculture Quarantine in Denpasar, Tuesday (12/10/2019).

Strict Prevention Of African Swine Flu

Swine flu virus particles (influenza type A subtype H1N1).

It also discussed the source of ASF virus transmission that can be transmitted through passenger contaminated with viruses from epidemic countries, such as food ingredients that contain pork, as well as food / catering leftovers from aircraft and cruise ships originating from outbreak countries.

He said, the sources of this transmission became the focus of supervision to filter out the entry of the ASF outbreak to Bali.

With this Coordination Meeting, he continued, his team wanted to sharpen again the quarantine support for preventing the entry of ASF to Bali by involving stakeholders at the Airport, Seaport, Local Government, and managing aircraft and marine waste in the landfill (TPA) and breeders pigs around landfill in particular.

“The key to the success of ASF prevention in Bali is strong coordination”, he stressed while chairing the Coordination Meeting.

Strict Prevention Of African Swine Flu

African Swine Fever (ASF) or better known as African swine flu.

Meanwhile the Chairperson of the Bali branch of the Indonesian Veterinarian Association (PDHI) Prof. I Kt Puja revealed, the most effective thing to do now is to prevent the entry of the disease since there is no cure and vaccine yet.

With this coordination meeting, it is hoped that the ASF virus filter that enters Bali can be layered and prevention efforts can provide maximum results.

Namely acting as resources were the Chairperson of the Bali Branch PDHI, the Denpasar Veterinary Center and from the Denpasar Agricultural Quarantine in the presence of Regional Government Agencies and Stakeholders who were directly involved both at the Airport and Sea Port.

Confirmed, the status of ASF disease that has become epidemic in several neighboring countries and the last in September 2019, such as the closest country of Indonesia, namely Timor Leste, has been established as a country with this one epidemic.

 

Strict Prevention Of African Swine Flu

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Source : https://bali.bisnis.com


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The Marmalade Sessions & Rio Sidik

The Marmalade Sessions, is about to kick off one heck of a Big Bang! on Saturday 30 November 2019. at
The Orchard Bar & Restaurant Nakula Street, Alley No. 99x on Seminyak  Bali,
With the original Orchard family brothers, The Island Souls Donee, Deny, Glen, Momo, Joe, I’ll be running us through another magical Saturday night of exceptional music, showmanship and on top of that we have Bali’s heavy hitting, internationally famous trumpet extraordinaire Rio Sidik

A night that will be infused with The Marmalade Sessions  from blues rock to reggae and folk, these lads will blow the roof off your weekend in true Orchard style !!


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Come down and be part of a true Orchard live music experience with the best talent the island has to offer!

Show starts at 8 PM.
Come early and fire up with our Happy Hour from 5 to 7 PM with buy one get one free on all of our delicious mouthwatering cocktails.
And also Buy Two Get One Free from 8 till late!

The Orchard Bar & Restaurant music venue in Bali. Located in Seminyak. Local and international live bands 5 nights a week. Happy hour 5-7 PM every day. Award-winning restaurant.

The Orchard is a home away from home, with great food, the largest selection of draft beers and ales on the island, with the friendliest staff anywhere on Bal i.

Three nights a week the venue becomes the home of contemporary Indonesian music. Come down on any Tuesday, Thursday or Saturday to see for yourself and check our events page for details on who is playing.

More info : http://www.theorchardbali.com


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Cooking Competition Denpasar Nov 23rd 2019

Cooking Competition Denpasar Pasar market Saturday November 11 th

 


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The Cooking Competition Denpasar Market event is a free event on Saturday November 2019 from 8 AM held on the parking area of Bali’s largest covered marked named the Pasar Badung Market located in Denpasar .

Cooking Competition entitled Meratengan  Pasar Market in the Badung Market Parking Area .

This event has been organised by the Denpasar City Tourism Office in collaboration with Artha Dyan International College and ICA. Denta Wisesa, Made Bawa and Nanoo Biroe.

Head of Tourism Resources and Creative Economy, I Wayan Hendaryana said, this activity will be followed by 10 teams, each team consisting of three participants from high school and vocational level.

Participants who have been registered include teams from SMKN 3 Denpasar, SMKN 4 Denpasar, SMKN 5 Denpasar, SMK Prasanti Nilayam Kuta, Harapan Tourism Vocational School, SMK PGRI 3 Denpasar, SMK PGRI 4 Denpasar, SMK PGRI 5 Denpasar and SMK Duta Bangsa Denpasar .

He added, the purpose of this activity was to test the ability of the younger generation and especially in the creativity of the cooking and presentation from the indonesian cooking style and talent. In addition, this competition is also to introduce the potential of the Gajah Mada heritage area, especially the Badung Market who is  now  one of Bali’s major tourist attractions, thanks to its portrayal of the island’s traditional culture and therefore is a must-visit destination for everyone.

As one of the economic hubs in the town, the traditional market plays a key role in promoting the town’s economic landscape. The market is located on Gajah Mada Street which is one of the main roads in town.

In the competition, each participant is given 1.5 hours to cook. Including to buy ingredients directly at the Badung Market, for further judging by the jury.

 

There will be lots of interesting prizes too, starting from cash and cash for participants to Door prizes for the audience from sponsors,

Cooking Competition Denpasar

Source : https://bali.tribunnews.com


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2019 Ubud Writers & Readers Festival: 8 great events to look out for this year

Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Minister Susi Pudjiastuti was a speaker at the 2018 Ubud Writers and Readers Festival. Here, she is photographed with BBC Journalist Rebecca Henschke. Photo: UWRF

It’s almost time to welcome the region’s biggest festival of words — next month, Bali’s beloved little jungle town of Ubud will play host to some of the world’s most notable and thought-provoking authors, journalists, artists and activists for five days of event programming during late October.


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This year, the 16th Ubud Writers & Readers Festival (UWRF) is presenting some kickass speakers and much-needed topical discussions on the state of arts and culture in today’s world — under the Hindu principle of “Karma” as its theme, this year’s festival’s program will explore the idea of how the decisions we make today are shaping our shared future.

According to UWRF Founder & Director Janet DeNeefe, the speakers who were invited (and being celebrated at the 16th year of the festival) are individuals “who are deeply aware of the consequences of their actions.”

“At a time when the consequences of climate change are impossible to ignore, and world leaders continue to evade responsibility, we’ll ask what Karma looks like in 2019, and consider the tensions that emerge when we don’t look it squarely in the face,” DeNeefe said in a statement.

Diversity in representation is also key for the festival this year, since “… there’s something in the air right now – a crackling hunger for diverse voices from lesser-known regions, for works in translations by people of color, for stories that open our eyes to worlds completely unlike our own, said DeNeefe.

UWRF’s event programs vary widely — beyond panel discussions and author talks, participants can also take part in book launches, workshops, film screenings and art performances throughout the festival.

Running from Oct. 23 to 27, UWRF will feature a number of Indonesia’s most prominent names in the arts and literary world, including award-winning author and journalist Laksmi Pamuntjak, film directors Garin Nugroho and Richard Oh, veteran journalists Leila S. Chudori and Maria Hartiningsih, as well as author, artist and gender activist Eliza Vitri Handayani.

Organizers have also lined up appearances by Lindy West, a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times, and who is also known as a feminist firebrand, plus Chinese-American author Jenny Zhang, Iranian-American writer and religious scholar Reza Aslan, as well as Indonesia’s very own human rights advocate Andreas Harsono.

There are heaps of interesting events in the schedule this year, but as a primer/cheat sheet for those of you who want it, here’s the Coconuts Bali rundown of the very best and brightest happenings in UWRF’s upcoming program next month.